Wednesday, March 28, 2018

The Jesus Mysteries by Tim Freke (Book Review)

SPOILER ALERT: Do NOT read this post if you are devout Christian, as it takes a lot of getting used to (even for moderates). Read it if you are interested in Ancient Egypt. 


Three years ago I watched a BBC documentary on the first centuries of Christianity. Among other things, it looked specifically at a subset of pagan religions that were very popular 2000 years ago and how Christianity absorbed them. There were several scholars discussing passages in the New Testament and how some events in the account of Jesus' life were taken directly from these pagan 'mystery' religions.  


I put off writing about this because it was seriously depressing. One of these events was Jesus riding into Jerusalem on a donkey on Palm Sunday. Another was the actual date of December 25th, when a pagan god known as Mithras was said to have been born. Historians place the likely birth of baby Jesus in the spring, as there is evidence of the census that was ordered at the time that Jesus was born. Another similarity is the visual of Jesus on the cross - the picture to the left is from a pagan relic B.C. The cross is recognized all over the world, but the Gospels sometimes say Jesus was hung from a tree.   

This BBC documentary drew many parallels between Christianity and various pagan myths, especially the mystery religions in Ancient Egypt and Palestine. 

One of the speakers on the show was a man called Timothy Freke, co-author of the most jarring and controversial book I have read, called The Jesus Mysteries: Was the Original Jesus a Pagan God? In the book, Timothy Freke and Peter Gandy go through almost every scene in the New Testament, telling us what pagan religion it was taken from. There were 5 or 6 pagan myths with somewhat similar storylines, all part of a broader spiritual movement. The book is detailed, it is obvious that a huge amount of work went into writing it. But even for me, a lapsed Catholic, it was  the most depressing book I had ever read. If it was true, it would make me doubt everything. 


There was a bright side to the book, or I wouldn't review it. The authors suggest that mystery religions were about establishing a direct connection with God through mystical means, using the story as a spiritual guide. The story itself was not to be taken literally, but even with mystery religions, the public often did. They advocate viewing the Gospels symbolically and gleaning messages that will help us grow spiritually and emotionally, like Eckart Tolle's interpretations in A New Earth. 


It is worth reading, but I have to admit that I didn't enjoy the book at all. In part because of the tone, which is often antagonistic to the Church. And sensationalist. I may not be a practicing Catholic, but I still value my upbringing, and I do connect with Mary, Jesus and the saints in my own meditations. I was half-hoping none of the things in the book were true, so I set out to fact check it. That is when I stumbled across a term paper written by Dr Martin Luther King Jr, which was published at Stanford: The Influence of Mystery Religions on Christianity {LINK}

Dr King's paper takes a much friendlier approach with Christianity. He mentions most of the parallels from Freke's book - thereby verifying the facts - without discrediting Christianity or making us feel like Santa Claus doesn't exist (multiplied by a 1000). In retrospect, there is nothing inherently depressing about the facts that are laid out. It was just the thought of having it wrong all my life, or only having half of the picture. 

Freke's book advocates Gnosticism which involves viewing the Bible as symbolic and using it as a path to develop a personal connection with God - finding our Inner Christ. The Church chose the literal interpretation where Jesus dies and comes back to life, but if you major in History at a Jesuit university, you will learn about the ancient mystery religions and the massive crossover they had with Christianity. I asked a friend who studied History at a Jesuit University in Mexico and she knew all about it. 

Go figure. 

On a personal Diary of a Psychic Healer note, the intuitive meditations that we use to connect with archangels can also be used to connect with Mary or with Jesus (link). When we activate our Aura and Chakras the first beings we sense are angels, then guides, and then the big guns, like Mary and Jesus. On a spiritual level, I am certain they exist and think there is more to Christianity than we know. I don't often blog about religion, but this has been in my drafts since 2015 and I wanted to share it. 


An Intuitive Meditation (20 Minutes)





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Regina Chouza is a qualified Energy Healer, Angel Medium and author of Self-Healing, Cancer & Love and Chakra Healing & Magick. A graduate of the School of Intuition & Healing in London, she is developing a new technique that combines natal astrology, energy healing and crystals. Subscribe for an introduction to grounding, clearing and shielding your personal energy HERE.

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2 comments:

  1. Nice post. I used to be checking constantly this blog and I'm
    inspired! Very useful information specially the ultimate section :
    ) I handle such info a lot. I was seeking this certain info for a very
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    Replies
    1. Hello! Thank you so much for the comment, and I am glad that you appreciated the last part because my intention in writing the post was to open us to new ways of connecting and bringing that Christ energy into our lives, as well as Mary, the sacred feminine 💕💕💕

      I do hope you’ll visit the blog again, and if you would like to subscribe, on the link below you will also receive a gift to lay the foundations for your own intuition:

      http://www.diaryofapsychichealer.com/p/chakra-healing-ebook.html

      Reiki hugs,


      Regina

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